Phones with Low Radiation Levels in 2024

Updated July 02, 2024 Dan Science

Phone Radiation

The use of smartphones has become an integral part of our daily lives. However, not many people are aware of the potential health risks associated with the radiation emitted by these devices. It is crucial for users to pay attention to the radiation levels of their phones to protect themselves from excessive exposure.

Understanding Radiation Levels in Phones

Radiation from smartphones can have various negative impacts on our health, including an increased risk of cancer. According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), smartphone radiation is considered potentially carcinogenic. This emphasizes the importance of choosing phones with low radiation levels to minimize health risks.

The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) is a measure of the rate at which energy is absorbed by the body when exposed to a radiofrequency electromagnetic field. The SAR values for phones are divided into two categories: SAR for the head and SAR for the body. Ideally, lower SAR values indicate that a phone emits less radiation.

Phones with Low Radiation Levels in 2024

According Gizchin, the following is a list of smartphones with the lowest radiation levels for 2024:

No Phone Model SAR (head) SAR (body)
1 ZTE Blade Vl 0 0.13 W/kg 0.22 W/kg
2 Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ 0.19 W/kg 0.28 W/kg
3 Samsung Galaxy Note 10 0.21 W/kg 0.29 W/kg
4 LG G7 ThinQ 0.24 W/kg 0.32 W/kg
5 Huawei P30 0.33 W/kg 0.41 W/kg
6 Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 0.34 W/kg 0.42 W/kg
7 Honor XS 0.84 W/kg 1.02 W/kg
8 Apple iPhone 11 0.95 W/kg 1.13 W/kg
9 Realme GT Neo 3 0.91 W/kg 1.09 W/kg
10 Samsung Galaxy AS3 SG 0.90 W/kg 1.08 W/kg
11 Samsung Galaxy A23 0.90 W/kg 1.08 W/kg
12 OPPO Reno 7 0.89 W/kg 1.07 W/kg
13 Xiaomi 12X 0.88 W/kg 1.06 W/kg
14 OnePlus 10 Pro 0.87 W/kg 1.0 S/W/kg
15 Vivo X80 0.86 W/kg 1.04 W/kg
16 Google Pixel 6 0.85 W/kg 1.03 W/kg
17 Motorola Moto GSO SG 0.85 W/kg 1.03 W/kg
18 Realme GT Neo 2 0.84 W/kg 1.02 W/kg
19 Samsung Galaxy A73 SG 0.84 W/kg 1.02 W/kg
20 OPPO Find XS Lite 0.83 W/kg 1.01 W/kg
  • SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) for head: The amount of RF energy absorbed by tissues in the head area, including the brain, acoustic nerves, salivary glands, and thyroid gland.
  • SAR for body: The amount of RF energy absorbed by body tissues, specifically those located away from the head, such as the hips or pockets

By opting for smartphones with lower SAR values, users can mitigate the potential health risks associated with phone radiation.

The Impact of Phone Radiation on Health

Excessive exposure to phone radiation can lead to various health issues, including brain tumors, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, fatigue, and headaches. It is crucial to be aware of these risks and take steps to reduce exposure to radiation by choosing phones with lower SAR values.

Adhering to Safe Radiation Standards

To protect users from the negative effects of radiation, the Federal Communications Commission has set a standard Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of 1.6 watts per kilogram as the safe limit for phone radiation. Manufacturers are striving to produce devices that meet this safety threshold, ensuring that users can use their phones safely without concerns about the potential health impacts of radiation.

Selecting Phones with Low Radiation

It is essential for users to prioritize their health when selecting a new smartphone. By considering the radiation levels of a device and opting for one with lower SAR values, users can minimize their exposure to radiation and reduce the associated health risks.

In conclusion, being mindful of phone radiation levels is crucial for safeguarding our well-being in the long run. By choosing phones with low radiation levels, users can enjoy the benefits of technology without compromising their health. Always prioritize your health when choosing a smartphone and opt for devices with lower radiation levels for a safer user experience.

Remember, a healthy choice today leads to a healthier tomorrow.

Published: June 23, 2024
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